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Turmeric Curcumin 500Mg Extract (60 Tablets)

$56.99 $16.99

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Learn how you can benefit today from the Nutra Blast Turmeric Curcumin

What is Turmeric Curcumin ?

Turmeric comes from the Curcuma longa plant, which grows in India and other Southeast Asian countries. The dried root of the Curcuma longa plant is ground into the distinctive yellow turmeric powder. There are several chemical compounds found in turmeric, known as curcuminoids. The active substance in turmeric is curcumin. Curcumin is what makes turmeric a “functional food,” defined by the Mayo Clinic as “foods that have a potentially positive effect on health beyond basic nutrition.” The best part about turmeric? Not only is it well-researched, incredibly potent and historically significant, it’s also safe. Turmeric has very few known side effects, and the ones that exist are incredibly rare and generally mild. (1, 2, 3) Imagine saying that about most medications!

The History of Turmeric Curcumin

The history of curcumin - considered one of the most beneficial compounds from turmeric (Curcuma longa) dates back about 5,000 years. It was a principal healing agent in Ayurveda, and traditional Indian system of medicine, and recognized as a valuable ingredient long before it became popular as a supplement. The bright yellow-orange pigment of turmeric is the primary source curcumin. Breaking this down further, there are sub-compounds or "fractions" of curcumin called "curcuminoids". Turmeric contains demothoxycurcumin, otherwise known as "curcumin II", bisdemethooxycurcumin, known as "curcumin III" and cyclocurcumin. These compounds make up, on an average, about 3 to 5 percent of turmeric, although some in some regions of India, the turmeric actually contains higher levels, reaching 6 to 8 percent because of locally favorable growing conditions and farming practices. The curcumin products you're likely to find in health food stores contain a mixture of curcuminoids, depending on the way they've been processed. Turmeric is typically grown in warmer regions, including India, China, and Southeast Asia. The brightly colored complex of curcumin (well-known to anyone who has eaten curry) is sometimes referred to as Indian saffron, yellow ginger, yellow root, ukon, kacha haldi, or simply natural yellow. After the roots are harvested, they are cleaned in water, cured and dried. After drying the root is ground for use as a spice, or the curcumin is extracted to be used for its health benefits. These days, most people probably know curcumin by enjoying curry made with turmeric. The fat content of coconut milk and other ingredients in traditional Indian cooking help curcumin absorb in the digestive tract, so growing up eating curry very likely has some protective and medicinal effect. However, there is increasing research that shows that concentrated extracts of curcumin are very strong as well - plus, they have the benefit of being convenient and proven effective! Turmeric, the golden colored strongly flavored spice, is having a “moment.” This ancient spice, celebrated for centuries as both food and medicine, has resurfaced within the health and nutrition communities thanks to curcumin, the healing substance which supplies its vibrant color. Curcumin has significant anti-inflammatory properties that are said to rival those found in ibuprofen. Unlike over-the-counter drugs, turmeric has no toxic effects on the body. Curcumin’s powerful antioxidant advantages have been shown to protect healthy cells, particularly those found in the colon, from cancer-causing agents. It aids the body in destroying mutated cancer cells before they have a chance to spread to other areas. Turmeric also helps to lower cholesterol and prevent heart disease. All that, and it’s tasty too! Turmeric’s botanical name is Curcuma longa. The plant reaches barely three feet in height and produces both a flower and a rhizome, or stem that is found underground. The rhizome has an appearance similar to ginger; it is this root-like stem that produces the yellow turmeric spice. Though it can now be found throughout the tropics, India has been the largest producer of turmeric since ancient times. In recent years turmeric has attracted quite a bit of interest for its natural healing properties, but it has actually been used medicinally for over 4,500 years. Analyses of pots discovered near New Delhi uncovered residue from turmeric, ginger and garlic that dates back as early as 2500 BCE. It was around 500 BCE that turmeric emerged as an important part of Ayurvedic medicine. Ayurveda is an ancient Indian system of natural healing that is still practiced today. Ayurveda translates to “science of life”– ayur meaning “life” and veda meaning “science or knowledge.” Inhaling fumes from burning turmeric was said to alleviate congestion, turmeric juice aided with the healing of wounds and bruises, and turmeric paste was applied to all sorts of skin conditions – from smallpox and chicken pox to blemishes and shingles. Ayurvedic literature contains over 100 different terms for turmeric, including jayanti, meaning “one who is victorious over diseases,” and matrimanika, meaning “as beautiful as moonlight.” In Indian culture, the importance of turmeric goes far beyond medicine. The Hindu religion sees turmeric as auspicious and sacred. There is a wedding day tradition in which a string, dyed yellow with turmeric paste, is tied around the bride’s neck by her groom. This necklace, known as a mangala sutra, indicates that the woman is married and capable of running a household. The tradition still continues in Hindu communities and has been compared to the Western exchange of wedding rings. In parts of southern India, a piece of the turmeric rhizome is worn as an amulet for protection against evil spirits. The vibrant yellow natural coloring of turmeric has also been used to dye clothing and thread for centuries. Saffron-hued Buddhist robes are dyed with turmeric. In Kerala, a state in southwest India, children were given turmeric-dyed clothing to wear during the Onam festival. The reason for this is unclear, though it likely has to do with the color’s association with Lord Krishna. Most of us are familiar with turmeric as a cooking spice. It appeared in Hannah Glasse’s 1747 cookbook, The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy. Hannah shares a recipe for India pickle made with turmeric; a later edition calls for turmeric in a recipe for Indian curry. Around this time, commercial curry powders became available. An advertisement for Sorlie’s Perfumery Warehouse curry powder claimed that their spice blend “renders the stomach active in digestion – the blood naturally free in circulation – the mind vigorous – and contributes most of any food to an increase in the human race.” In the United States, curry appeared in the 1831 edition of Mrs. Mary Randolph’s Virginia Housewife. Over the years I’ve developed several recipes containing turmeric. If you’d like to try your hand at cooking with this remarkable spice, you’ll find several tempting options below. Enjoy in good health!

 

The Benefits of Turmeric Curcumin

1. May Slow or Prevent Blood Clots For many people, the formation of blood clots is a major concern. How do you develop a clot (also called a thrombus)? Blood clots form through a process called “platelet aggregation,” where blood platelets concentrate in one area and eventually clot. In both lab and animal studies, the use of curcumin from turmeric greatly reduces instances of platelet aggregation and potentially reduces the risk of a clot forming. (4, 5, 6) Curcumin modifies an internal process known as eicosanoid biosynthesis. Eiconsanoids consist of four different molecules within the body that are involved in the natural inflammation process. It has been suggested that one reason that curcumin has anti-clotting properties is the way it affects the biosynthesis of thromboxanes, one of the four eicosanoids. (7) This same mechanism is one reason turmeric is an anti-inflammatory substance. One combination lab and animal study conducted in 1986 even suggests curcumin may be a preferable treatment method for people “prone to vascular thrombosis and requiring antiarthritic therapy.” (8) However, this result still needs to be replicated in human trials.

2. Reduces Depression Symptoms Although few studies have been conducted on humans, dozens of research trials have proven that turmeric benefits include being especially effective in reducing depression symptoms in laboratory animals. (9, 10, 11, 12) These results seem to be connected to the way curcumin impacts neurotransmitter function through the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). (13) To address this issue, the journal Phytotherapy Research published the results of an amazing, innovative study in 2014. The study took 60 volunteers diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and split the group to determine how patients treated by curcumin fared against fluoxetine (PROZAC®) and a combination of the two. (14) Not only was it discovered that all patients tolerated curcumin well, but they discovered curcumin was equally effective as fluoxetine in managing depression by the six-week mark. Combining fluoxetine with curcumin resulted in a slightly higher improvement, but it was not considered statistically significant. According to the authors, “This study provides first clinical evidence [emphasis added] that curcumin may be used as an effective and safe therapy for treatment in patients with mild depression.” Since that breakthrough trial, at least two other studies have observed the impact of turmeric’s major compound, curcumin, in patients with depression. The first involved 56 individuals (male and female), and the second involved 108 male participants. Both used a placebo but did not compare curcumin to any antidepressant, and both studies found that curcumin effectively reduced depression symptoms more than placebo. (15, 16) As antidepressants on the market currently only yield about a 10–20 percent effectiveness rating when you remove the placebo effect, I’d call that a pretty significant result! (17)

3. Fights Inflammation Arguably, the most powerful aspect of curcumin is its ability to control inflammation. The journal Oncogene published the results of a study that evaluated several anti-inflammatory compounds and found that aspirin and ibuprofen, two of the most common NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) are least effective, while curcumin is among the most effective anti-inflammatory compounds in the world. (18) This news should have reached every household in the world after the study was conducted, because inflammation is at the root of most diseases. Increasingly common diseases today — such as cancer, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, high cholesterol and chronic pain — are all associated with inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin have also been studied as a possible treatment for Alzheimer’s disease. According to the Alzheimer’s Society, evidence for turmeric’s effects on Alzheimer’s patients is inconclusive; it’s not certain that turmeric can prevent or treat the disease. (19) Several animal trials have been completed investigating the relationship of curcumin and Alzheimer’s. In rats, it seems that curcumin “reverses existing amyloid pathology and associated neurotoxicity,” a key feature of the progression of this neurological disease related to chronic inflammation. (20, 21, 22) Some human trials have also been conducted. A six-month study in Hong Kong found that curcumin was very tolerable, but both the placebo and curcumin group experienced no statistically significant loss of cognitive function, so the two groups couldn’t be compared. (23) Similar results have been discovered in other studies, and researchers cite the small subject sample, limited study time and poor bioavailability of curcumin in the tested samples as possible reasons no effect was recorded reflective of animal study results. (24, 25, 26) Today, scientists are still searching for a formulation of curcumin that is effectively bioavailable (meaning that the human body absorbs and metabolizes it) and that crosses the blood-brain barrier. (27) While it may be some time before human trials nail down the specifics, these findings are still incredibly promising.

4. Boosts Skin Health Turmeric benefits include anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that have proven effective in treating multiple skin conditions. Turmeric benefits for skin include increasing “glow and luster” of the skin, speeding up wound healing, calming the pores to decrease acne and acne scarring and controlling psoriasis flares. (28, 29, 30, 31) One uncontrolled pilot study involving 814 participants even suggests that turmeric paste could cure 97 percent of scabies cases within 3–15 days. (32) Try my Turmeric Face Mask for Glowing Skin. Just keep in mind that turmeric can stain the skin and it may cause an allergic reaction. Do a patch test by applying a dime-size amount to your forearm. Then, wait 24–48 hours to check for any reaction before applying turmeric to your face.

5. May Outperform Common Arthritis Drug Because curcumin is known for its powerful anti-inflammatory and pain-reducing characteristics, a study was conducted on 45 rheumatoid arthritis patients to compare the benefits of curcumin in turmeric to the arthritis drug diclofenac sodium (an NSAID), which put people at risk of developing leaky gut and heart disease. The study split these volunteers into three groups: curcumin treatment alone, diclofenac sodium alone, and a combination of the two. The results of the trial were eye-opening:

Why Turmeric Curcumin Is The #1

When opting for curcumin supplements, one is bound to get confused because there are so many different formulations available and also so many brands. So, here are the best turmeric / curcumin supplement formulation and best brands. We also discuss in detail what these formulations contain and how do they affect the bioavailability and which conditions they benefit. Best curcumin supplement formulations are: 1.Curcumin C3 complex 2.Curcumin Bioperine 3.Turmeric Curcumin Meriva Supplement 4.Longvida 5.Curcumin Theracurmin 6.BCM-95 Curcumin

Top 3 Questions People Ask About Turmeric Curcumin

1.What is Turmeric Curcumin? Turmeric curcumin is a medicinal spice that derives from the roots of the Curcuma Longa plant (a member of the ginger family). The root and stem of the plant are ground up very fine and is used for medicinal purposes as well as in a variety of foods.

2.What is the difference between Turmeric and Curcumin? Turmeric is the plant and curcumin is within the turmeric plant. Curcumin (made up of curcuminoids) is the active ingredient within the plant and makes up 2-6% of the plant. It offers amazing medicinal purposes for healing the body.

3. What Should I Take Turmeric With? Turmeric possesses many potent health benefits. The catch? It has low bioavailability, meaning only some of the benefits of the root are absorbed while the rest go to waste. Fortunately, there are a few ways to increase the bioavailability. First, consume turmeric with a healthy fat such as coconut oil. Turmeric is soluble in oil, but not in water so it should be paired with a fat to increase absorption. Many people will consume turmeric as “golden milk,” a recipe that combines turmeric with grass-fed dairy milk, coconut or almond milk, along with honey, ginger and black pepper to increase adsorption. However, the most popular way to improve the bioavailability of turmeric is to consume it with not just a healthy fat but also piperine found in black pepper. A study published in Planta Medica found that consuming just 5mg piperine with turmeric increase its bioavailability by a whopping 2,000%.

Tips for a Turmeric Curcumin

1. Add it to scrambles and frittatas. Use a pinch of turmeric in scrambled eggs, a frittata, or tofu scramble. If you or your family are new to turmeric, this is a great place to start because the color is familiar and the flavor subtle. Get a Recipe: Southwestern Tofu Scramble

2. Toss it with roasted vegetables. Turmeric's slightly warm and peppery flavor works especially well with cauliflower, potatoes, and root vegetables. Get a Recipe: Cauliflower Steaks with Ginger, Turmeric, and Cumin

3. Add it to rice. A dash of turmeric brings color and mild flavor to a pot of plain rice or a fancier pilaf. Get a Recipe: Fragrant Yellow Rice

4. Try it with greens. Sprinkle turmeric into sautéed or braised greens like kale, collards, and cabbage. Get a Recipe: Cabbage in Mild Yogurt and Mustard Seed Curry 5. Use it in soups. A bowl of vegetable or chicken soup feels even more warming when it's tinged with golden turmeric.

 

NUTRABLAST TURMERIC CURCUMIN 500MG EXTRACT

NUTRABLAST TURMERIC CURCUMIN 500MG EXTRACT

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